Potter’s Lake House

What happens at The Lake, Stays at The Lake

October 26, 2007

Filed under: random thoughts — potterhauk @ 10:00 pm

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October 25, 2007

Filed under: random thoughts — potterhauk @ 4:31 pm
 

CiCi is 3 October 24, 2007

Filed under: random thoughts — potterhauk @ 5:36 pm

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how engage-ing

Filed under: random thoughts — potterhauk @ 5:18 pm

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im so happy for my friends. love peace and chicken grease

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October 17, 2007

Filed under: random thoughts — potterhauk @ 12:34 pm

The rationale for sailing can rarely be quantified in economic terms that can be explained to your friends who do not sail. Those of us who partake in this sport do so because we realize that we have a limited amount of time available to us and that sailing enriches our life experience. I encourage all of you next time you are on the water, to remember that the water responds the same to wind today as it has throughout time. As everything changes around us, it is rare to have one benchmark from which to measure yourself in life. So, the next time to you are on the water and something seems different, it is most likely you that has changed.

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Star Boat October 8, 2007

Filed under: random thoughts — potterhauk @ 4:57 pm

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Life Lessons October 3, 2007

Filed under: random thoughts — potterhauk @ 9:35 pm

1. Owners work long hours for a reason. There’s more work than there are people. If you’re seeking balance, seek it elsewhere.

2. Bad customers will drain you of passion. Really bad customers will drain you of both passion and profits. Unfortunately, most bad customers will degenerate into really bad customers if you don’t do something about it.

3. If you’re changing direction often, worry a little. If you’re changing people often, worry a lot.

4. It’s lonely at the top, but even lonelier at the bottom. In the early days of a business, hardly anyone wants to talk to you (except some desperate vendors).

5. Eventually, your product will need to work and do something useful. No amount of marketing or strategy will get you around this.

6. At the end of each day, ask yourself: “Did the product get better for customers today?”. If you don’t have a good answer, stay up until you do.

7. Until you are profitable, time is working against you. Once you are profitable, time is on your side.

8. Learn to take calculated risks. The market rarely rewards safe bets.